First Aid

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First Aid skills critical for all ages

First Aid saves lives, making it an essential skill set for people of all ages, as you never know when you may it may be needed.

To extend the safety nets within our communities and to put into action 2021 World First Aid Day’s theme of “First Aid in Schools”, Naomi Taylor from Cire Training recently met with Peter Beams, one of our valued trainers, to discuss how children and young people particularly can be equipped with a basic skills ‘toolkit’.

Peter, who has previously shared first aid tips with staff and children at Cire Early Learning centres and local primary schools, emphasised that each child is different, and parents and carers should use messaging that best align with their family’s language.

Some of Peter’s key tips and advice include:

Calling 000: Teaching children how to call for help is a great way of including them in a safety plan.  Basic information like how to utilise the “Emergency Call” option on a locked mobile phone, could save crucial minutes.  Learning your address, or having details somewhere children can see them, will also help in an emergency, but this can be age-appropriate.

Finding someone unconscious: Most people know ‘DRSABCD’, or some variation of it, however Peter reminds us that any action is better than nothing.  If you (or your child) encounter someone who is unresponsive, simply rolling them on to their side, and tilting their head back can be the key to saving their life.  Call 000 as soon as possible. As a refresher, DRSABCD is an acronym for Danger, Response, Send for help, Airway, Breathing, Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and Defibrillation

Nose bleeds: It is now considered best practice to have the patient bend their head forward slightly (not back, as previously encouraged).  If available, add a cold washer or ice pack to the back of the neck.

Choking: If someone is coughing, they should continue to do so, as this is the body trying to dislodge the blockage.  If the coughing ceases, lean the patient forward and administer back blows in an upward motion to assist them.

Peter’s information prompted Naomi to reflect on her real-life experience with First Aid; “When he was a toddler, my son tried to eat a full apricot and started choking on the pip. Fortunately, I was able to react promptly by laying him over my knee and giving him some back blows to help him cough it out.  I never thought I’d need to use this knowledge, but I am so thankful that I had learnt it.”

As research and knowledge improves, so do the recommendations for various treatments. It is best to refresh First Aid skills every three years and CPR education every 12 months, at least, to ensure you have the most up-to-date information.

Cire offers a range of training options, from our “First Aid Fast” sessions targeting parents and others who care for children. We also have a series of accredited short courses, from the base level, to the additional skills needed for those working in an education or care settings.  Individualised training can also be arranged for groups and businesses.

For more information visit the Cire Training website.

YVCS Students gain skills on mental health

Yarra Valley Community School was successful in obtaining funding via Yarra Ranges Youth Services Resilience funding program. Using this grant we sourced and implemented a training program with all the Yarra Junction campus VCAL students. The training was called teen Mental Health First Aid (teen MHFA) which  was conducted in term 2 this year.

The course consisted of three full sessions of facilitated workshops which gives students the skills they need to recognise and help with mental health problems and the signs to look for in friends, and how to get the help of an adult quickly. Young people often help each other when they are feeling upset or stressed. The course gave attendees the tools needed to seek help and not take on the problems that a friend may be experiencing alone. Similar to the well-known physical First Aid the course covers the basics of mental health disorders which includes; how to recognise symptoms to help and when to call for external supports. At the completion of the three components the students were issued with a certificate which comes with international recognition.

The essence of the course is for the students to familiarise themselves with mental health language, supports and processes for referral within the broader community. The aim was to destigmatise mental health labels and increase the individual student’s mental health literacy.

To celebrate their efforts in undertaking this at times confronting training, the students were treated to a warm homemade lunch each week followed by a game of basketball to unwind at the Yarra Centre in Yarra Junction.

“The students really enjoyed the course and gained skills that will assist them well into their futures which is what our education programs strive to do. Proud to have participated and warmed all those student belly’s”. Kerry Ditcham YVCS Student Wellbeing Officer

Huge warm and wonderful thanks to Denise Warmington for running this brilliant program.

Congratulations to the students who achieved their certificates. 

To find out more about our VCAL program click here or call 03 5967 1776 Yarra Junction and 03 9736 1457 Mt Evelyn.