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Timely focus on loneliness

“Loneliness: the solution is community” is a particularly significant theme for Neighbourhood House Week 2020 this week, given the varying levels of social restrictions and lockdowns globally.

So, with people having to stay home, how can we connect with each other to maintain our sense of community? We hope the following might help.

It is great news that we can now welcome up to five friends or family members into our homes, or catch up outdoors in groups of up to 10, especially for those who have been missing their loved ones. However, please remember to maintain safe distancing and hygiene practices.

With the easing of some restrictions, some of our community’s most vulnerable people will still be isolated, so you might like to drop a note in their letterbox, offering assistance. Cire has created a simple form to offer your support.

Our Hubs team is proud to be part of the Community House network and help with the Outer East phone chat line. For anyone bored, isolated, lonely or just wanting someone new to talk to, we are here Monday – Friday 10.00am – 1.00pm and Monday – Thursday 5.00pm – 9.00pm or we can schedule callbacks outside of these times.  To get in touch for a chat, give us a call on 1800 984 825.

For those on Facebook, or other social media platforms, there are many ways to keep in touch. Now, more than ever, we are using our Community Hubs Facebook page to share information and stay connected with locals. Social media is a great way to have everyday interactions with family and friends, but it’s also full of groups to join.  If you have an interest, there’s sure to be a group of like-minded people.  We’ve been enjoying our “Lock-Down Lego” challenges, as a way to create connections with those who enjoy building.

Another option to grow your digital community is the “Next Door” website.  This platform helps people connect with their neighbours, posting information, as well as offers of goods, services or support.  As always, remember the core cyber-safety principles, and never share your personal information online.

Cire Craft Group

Cire Community Hub Craft Group catching up via Zoom

It has been exciting to see the ways that people have embraced using technology to engage with each other.  I had heard of FaceTime and knew that Messenger (Facebook) had a video call option, but I would have never thought that words like “Zoom” and “WebEx” would become so familiar, or add-ons like Microsoft Teams and Google Meet would become life-lines connecting with my colleagues. One of my favourite COVID-19 responses is the way our “crafters” have adapted to catching up via Zoom, rather than their usual Wednesday morning tea at the Chirnside Park Community Hub.  Chatting about current craft projects, grandchildren and offering mutual support is being done via video meeting, but the joy of connection is still very much alive.

Don’t forget our Hubs team is here for anyone needing some assistance in becoming familiar with using technology to connect to others.  Just give us a call on 1300 835 235, or email us at communityhubs@cire.org.au for more information.

Community garden ‘explodes’

While students were enjoying their school holidays, the Cire community garden at Mt Evelyn has been bursting at the seams with extensive growth.

The tomatoes, pumpkins and zucchini plants have been quickly filling up the beds and we have already harvested more than eight kilograms of delicious zucchinis. In true community spirit, Cire families and staff have shared the zucchinis for use in slices, relish casseroles, salad, grated into pasta, crumbed, filled and roasted and even made into a chocolate cake.

Other crops that have been harvested during the Spring/Summer season include rocket, garlic, silverbeet, snap peas, garlic chives, kale, spring onion, and herbs like parsley, chives, oregano, rosemary, nasturtiums and thyme.

This year we grew four varieties of potato – White, Desiree, Royal Blue and Brake Light. The White has been extremely abundant and large in size. For flavour and versatility, Royal Blue won hands down. Delicious roasted, fried, used in salads or mashed.

The garden has struggled against wild rats and we have done what we can to protect the crops and garden beds from their destruction. It has been devastating to discover their destruction of seedlings and crops such as basil, beans, peas and more recently, the entire corn crop.  However, we are always learning and adapting to our environment and hopefully, we can focus on the positives. We may not be able to harvest any corn this year but we could use the stalks as climbing frames for beans, a shelter for nearby crops and then mulch for the garden beds.

The biodiversity and health of the plants and soil, as well as the lush plantings, have encouraged an abundance of wonderful creatures who all call the garden home and have various roles to play. We have a family of three young kookaburras learning to fly and feed around the garden and also honey bees, hoverflies, butterflies, blue banded bees, lady beetles, rosellas, magpies all calling the garden home with various roles to play.

The students did an amazing job of tending to the garden during classes last year. They have injected their own unique style with art pieces and ornaments starting to appear, adding vibrancy and colour to the garden.

We are reaping many benefits from the garden. It is very productive with the array of self-sown vegetables and herbs, as well as providing seeds to collect and plant next season. The garden is also a peaceful haven for all involved. Such continuously expanding benefits are extremely rewarding and highlight how our garden awards are so well deserved.

We are looking forward to another fantastic and productive year. Happy gardening!

Jillian Dowling
Horticulture Trainer
Cire, Mt Evelyn

If you would more information on our training courses click here.

Cire joins Rotary

Cire Services Inc. has added further depth to its community partnerships by becoming one of the first organisational members of Wandin Rotary Club.

Cire has welcomed the initiative because it helps build on our existing relationship with Rotary and work even more closely with a service organisation very much driven by similar values and goals.

‘We are honoured to have been invited to join Rotary which is such an enormously respected organisation worldwide,’ Cire CEO, Gus Seremetis.

‘We already enjoy a great relationship, having partnered in various projects and we greatly look forward to more collaborations in the future to help improve the lives and opportunities for others in our region and beyond.’

In welcoming Cire, Wandin RC President, Heinz Budweg, said he looked forward to partnering more with Cire in the future to deliver many positive outcomes for people of all ages. He also commended Coldstream Primary School which joins Cire as the first organisational members with Wandin RC.

Wandin RC’s has provided invaluable support to Cire across its diverse services with initiatives including scholarships for students at the Community School, defibrillators for Cire Community House and our Mt Evelyn campus, and books for Yarra Junction Child Care Centre. Through Rotary connections, the Days for Girls program has been introduced at Cire Community School to help make education more accessible for girls in Third World Countries, and students have assisted with landscaping projects at Yering and Coldstream primary schools. Plans are also underway for Rotary to provide mock employment interviews for our students.

In jumping aboard Rotary, Cire has launched a postal stamp collection drive to support ROMAC – Rotary Oceania Medical Aid for Children. Please see the end of this article for details.

Rotary International has 1.2 million members and more than 35,000 clubs across the globe who contribute 16 million volunteer hours each year.
The organisation is driven by a philosophy that: ‘Together, we see a world where people unite and take action to create lasting change – across the globe, in our communities, and in ourselves… Each day, our members pour their passion, integrity, and intelligence into completing projects that have a lasting impact. We persevere until we deliver real, lasting solutions.’

For more than 110 years, Rotary has bridged cultures and connected continents to champion peace, fight illiteracy and poverty, promote clean water and sanitation, and fight disease.

Eliminating polio has been one of its greatest campaigns with 2.5 billion children immunised against the debilitating illness, particularly in Third World countries.

Another of its projects is ROMAC which funds life-saving and dignity-restoring surgery for young children from Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Fiji, Timor Leste, Vanuatu and Vietnam.

Everyone can help ROMAC by collecting used stamps. All you need to do is cut the stamp off the envelope (please do not peel off), leaving roughly a 2cm border. Once you have collected a few, drop them into Cire’s Yarra Junction office in an envelope marked ‘ROMAC – Sandra Bucovaz’.

A recent comedy night hosted by Wandin RC raised $13,000 for ROMAC!

If you would like further information on Rotary visit www.wandinrotary.org

Pictured: Cire’s Manager of Partnerships and Funding, Sandra Bucovaz, and Coldstream Primary School’s Chaplain, Chris Waizel, with Wandin RC president Heinz Budweg (centre).

Everyday skills can be hard for some

A surprising statistic for you – around 44% of adult Australians has literacy levels that make everyday tasks very difficult. Sadly, our numeracy levels are worse with over half of Australian adults scoring low on international surveys.

If you have been able to read this so far, fortunately, you are likely not a contributor to this statistic.

Low literacy or numeracy ability is not just being able to read this blog. It is so much more. Social exclusion, financial hardship, struggle to pay for a coffee, not being able to help your kids with their homework or hearing your child tackling with their first words and dreading when they ask, “What’s this word?”, in their high pitched inquisitive little voices.

More worryingly, however, is the health impact this can have on individuals. Not being able to read instructions on a medical prescription and let’s not even start with reading the health benefits of chia seeds, matcha powder and goji berries – what berries?  Low fat, reduced fat, no added sugar, aaargh.

More practical low literacy levels can have a real impact on one’s employment prospects.

Workplaces never used to require as much arduous paperwork or there may be a entry exam as a part of the recruitment process.  Now there are logbooks for trucks drivers, OH&S requirements for factory workers to follow, policies to read and seemingly endless forms to complete.

So what can we do?

Here at Cire we have a number of Everyday Living Skill courses to not only improve your literacy and numeracy, but also improve your life skills, and in turn, your confidence and social interaction, all in a supportive and fun environment.

From Everyday English and Maths to Independent Living and cooking in Kitchen Kaos.  There is such a diverse range of courses to help anyone who wants to learn.

One day you can be going to the laundry mat or cooking up spaghetti bolognaise and the next increasing your reading and writing or setting out a simple budget in maths.

“My reading, writing and maths have really improved since starting at Cire. This makes me feel happy and more confident”. I also like coming to class to socialise with others – Robyn, Student, Everyday Learning Skills

Here are just some of the great courses on offer,

  • Independent Living
  • Kitchen Kaos and healthy living
  • Tech Hub
  • Everyday English
  • Intermediate English
  • Everyday Maths
  • Smart Money

If you or someone you know wants to learn more about our courses, please contact Cire on 1300 835 235 for further information. We also offer a free trial where you can attend a session to see whether the course suits your needs. ­­

Volunteer call out: Tax Help program

Cire Community House has just become a Tax Help centre and we are looking for a volunteer to run our Tax Help program.

Tax Help is a network of ATO-trained and accredited community volunteers who provide a free and confidential service to help people complete their tax returns online using myTax.

From July to October, every year Tax Help volunteers guide and encourage clients to prepare and lodge their own tax returns. They help people with simple individual tax matters to lodge their tax returns online with myTax and lodge claims for refunds of franking credits. Where necessary, they help clients create a myGov account and link to their online tax account.

You don’t need any special experience to be a Tax Help volunteer. Tax Help volunteers come from all areas of the community with a diverse range of ages and backgrounds. If you can spare a few hours each week between July and October, you can help.

The ATO will introduce you to myGov and myTax and show you how to prepare and lodge tax returns online. They will reimburse you for any reasonable out-of-pocket expenses, such as travel and phone calls.

You can become a Tax Help volunteer if you:

  • are at least 18 years old
  • have lived in Australia permanently for the last two years
  • can use a computer or mobile device
  • meet the requirements of a pre-engagement check (which includes a police records check)
  • can complete training, online and in person.

Volunteer training

Tax Help volunteers train between March and June each year.

Training is self-paced and online so you will need access to a computer and the internet.

An ATO community liaison officer will oversee and guide you through the training and support you once you begin delivering Tax Help in your community.

How to apply to be part of the Tax Help program

Applications are now open for Tax Help volunteers.

If you are interested in becoming a Tax Help volunteer and would like more information, email your name, phone number, suburb and state where you live to Individuals Tax Help at SBITtaxhelp@ato.gov.au by 20 April 2018. Alternatively, you can contact Simone from Cire Community House on 5967 1776 for further information.

Information provided by ATO website as of 01 March 2018

Connecting Generations

Since July the kindergarten children from Cire have been lucky enough to visit the Estia Health Aged Care Facility. As part of their experience, the children got to complete different activities to engage with the residents. They have painted artwork for the art show, played games, completed puzzles, been hands-on making threaded necklaces, worked together on craft activities, they sang songs, played musical instruments and had a chat. The residents even got to show off their favourite songs and share their memories with the children. Guiding the children through their past times and experiences was a highlight for them with the children eager to learn more.

On one of the excursions to Estia some of the children had made cards for their newly found friends, it was on this day that one of them was having a very special birthday, Elsbeth was turning 94. The children were able to celebrate with her and her friends by singing happy birthday and joining in on the fun. It was a joy to see Elsbeth have so many little friends celebrate her big day.

It’s wonderful to observe the two groups of people becoming more comfortable and open with each other, learning to communicate in different ways. There was even an animal resident that was a big hit with the children, a fat cat called Elle. She meandered her way through the centre collecting hugs and pats as she went. The children learnt that Elle the cat’s role was to make the residents feel calm and make Estia feel like home.

The interactions that have occurred have been simple and easy going, there has been some small talk, discussions of how to play games and what each other enjoys doing; some even mentioning what they had liked when ‘they’ were in kindergarten. One of the residents told me,

“It was so lovely seeing the children when they visited, they bring life back into my heart and I smile so much when they are here”. Resident of Estia Health Aged Care Facility

Through this exchange, the children have had the opportunity to connect, develop and experience what it means to have respect and to care for people of all ages and abilities.

We look forward to further developing our relationships and are excited to be working towards a fun Christmas concert for our new friends, with the possibility for them to attend our end of year graduation ceremony.

Thank you so much to the Estia Health Aged Care Facility for the having our children come and visit.

If you would like to find out more about our Cire Children’s Services kindergarten program or would like to come to the centre for a tour contact 1300 835 235.

 

Shooting Hoops set in concrete – Part II

Cire Children’s Centre at Yarra Junction were recently given an opportunity to upgrade the playground area with the addition of a brand new basketball ring and concrete court. This upgrade has given our kids a fantastic space to practice their shooting, dribbling and bouncing skills and as an extra bonus; a fun place to play down ball, hop-scotch and to be creative with chalk drawings.

Cire Children's Services - shooting hoopsThe children were so excited to see this project completed and were quick to make use of the new space. There have been so many benefits in gaining this new court; from safety in the playground to creating new friendships through play, with the older children teaching the younger ones new skills. Providing a safe area for our children to play basketball more effectively and allowing the balls to bounce consistently without rolling off down the hill or becoming covered in mud and getting the kids covered in dirt, not that they minded too much.

Ball games are now played all the time on the flat hard surface free of obstacles such as bumps, rocks and mud. When the children are engaging in a safe game of basketball they are learning life skills such as sharing, perseverance, accepting victory and defeat graciously, becoming a team player and overcoming obstacles. Many of the children come from different schools and this area has encouraged them to play together with the opportunity to form new friendships. They have gained a space that helps them spend their time in the sun in a fun and exciting environment.

We asked the children what they thought of the new space and this is what they had to say…

“I like the concrete better than the mud, because it helps the ball bounce better.” (Sam aged 6)

“I like the new basketball area because it is now easier to bounce the ball. The ball didn’t bounce before and sometimes it would pop because of the rocks on the ground.” (Peter aged 9)

“The concrete is harder than the mud and you can play basketball better .” (Riley aged 8)

The children’s responses show us that they are pleased with the new area. The basketball court has provided a harder, more weather appropriate area that can be played on all year round.

Physical activity is large part of Cire’s outside school hours care program. We encourage children to be active in play and learning. Having this new facility will play a big part in the wellbeing of each child and we would like to thank the Upper Yarra Community Enterprise for their generous donation.

We now all look forward seeing the children engage together, having fun, gaining opportunities to play in their new space.

Shooting Hoops in concrete Part I blog article

For further information all our children’s services click here or you can contact us on 1300 835 235.

Upper Yarra Community Enterprise

Helping people stay connected

On Christmas Day each year many of us pack up the car and drive off to spend precious time with family and enjoy a meal. Although this is something that may require planning, it is a relatively straight forward event. However, this is not the case if your home is four hours away and you’re a person living with an acquired brain injury (ABI) and paraplegia. Weeks of planning, not just about presents and food, is necessary. Consideration for quotes to hire essential equipment, a personal support worker and a wheelchair specific vehicle, are required through disability support service organisations.

Midyear 2016, a family set about planning to bring their paraplegic and ABI brother to Melbourne from North East Victoria, where he resides in a disability supported household. During the Christmas/New Year week, whilst staying at his brother and sister in law’s home, there was to be a reunion with nephews, another brother, and a sister flying in from interstate. A day drive to visit a second sister in country Victoria, was also planned.

The following is the experience of Karen, one of our dedicated Cire in home carers, in assisting one of our clients over the Christmas period.

On December 23rd, two siblings travelled to North East Victoria and swapped their vehicle for a wheelchair accessible van, hired for the week to transport their brother to Melbourne and to go on outings.

As an employee of Cire In Home Care, my involvement was to provide appropriate personal care in the morning and evening, which would entail support with toileting, showering, shaving, putting on compression stockings, and conducting bed to shower commode/wheelchair transfers with the help of the client’s brother.

Essential equipment was hired and delivered to the house. Items such as a height adjustable bed with side safety rails, shower commode, lifting hoist and sling for transfers were all needed.

Following the client’s documented morning and bedtime routines was all important to best support him; that he might remain calm, feel secure and happy away from his usual home environment. During the week he was mostly jovial and told me some very funny jokes. It was reassuring he seemed comfortable with my care of him; giving me confidence.

This family gave their brother the most wonderful Christmas. It fulfilled what was important to him, “keeping in contact with his siblings regularly.”

He said often during the week how thrilled he was being with them, thanking me for my help in making it possible. For my part, the family was very welcoming. Their brother is a real character and a very inspirational man. This assignment was surely a surprise Christmas experience!

At Cire In Home Care we are committed to helping our clients stay connected to family and friends. We regularly transport and support people to their functions and events throughout the year. Staying connected is important and we are there to help. For further information on Cire In Home Care call 1300 835 235 or click here.

 

 

More than just a job

Cire in home carers sometimes find themselves in the role of providing comfort and dignity to clients as they reach their end of life. When a carer has had a client for a long period of time, the emotional bonds develop and often there is a sense of loss and grief for the carer when their client passes away.

Carol is employed by Cire In Home Care and she is just one of many carers who have experienced the loss of a client. The following is Carol’s story.

“One of my first long term clients with Cire In Home Care had high support needs. Due to his condition, his mobility and verbal communication were limited. It was a big job with lots to do and so I felt more than a little nervous during that first ‘shadow shift’ following another support worker around. I remember meeting my client, a couple of family members and learning the routine. I asked questions and took a lot of notes that day, knowing I would be working on my own for most of the time afterwards.”

“It didn’t take long before my confidence increased. Written lists became second nature over time; tasks seemed less daunting as little tricks and good time management were learnt.”

“Clients have a way of teaching you a lot about pretty much everything, including yourself – and like anyone you develop a bond with; there will be some deep experiences. When there is little in the way of verbal communication, small gestures take over. Intuition and other senses can seem heightened, sometimes there’s just an understanding and a knowing of what needs doing.”

“Being a support worker feels like intimate and soulful work, rewarding but also challenging. Nothing quite prepares for the physical and emotional demands of caring for someone as they approach their end of life. It can be very busy but there are times when you just have to stop and be there, to hold a hand or offer a hug.”

“When my client passed away, I appreciated my supervisors checking in on me and passing on an invitation to the funeral. They’ve been there; they know what it’s like to lose people. There are a lot of mixed feelings – sadness, yet relief there’s no suffering, concern for their loved ones. It also felt good to go to the service, offer my condolences and emotional support to the family. I loved seeing photos and hearing stories of the younger man I never met, shared interests he’d been unable to tell me about. It gave me a sense of closure to say goodbye and pay my respects to a lovely man and a life well lived.”

Carol is one of many carers employed by Cire In Home Care and we are very fortunate to have such caring and compassionate staff. If you would like to find out more about the services offered by Cire In Home Care visit our website or contact Cire In Home Care Co-coordinator, Deb Wright, on 1300 835 235.

If you work in the industry, care for a loved one or need to know more about end of life. The Eastern Metropolitan Region Palliative Care Consortium is pleased to announce that ticket sales are now open Death and Dying – lifting the lid on it with Anny and Shelley event.  Places are limited, so early registration is recommended. It will be a fun and informative night. The event is open to the public and is relevant to everyone as we will all need to deal with these issues at some time in our lives.

A day in the life of an in home carer

Cire In Home Care is committed to supporting people to remain living in their own homes and staying connected to their communities. All staff are trained and qualified and have specialist skills in working with children, people with disabilities, people at the end of their life, dementia care, personal care, food preparation, transport and assisting people who are socially isolated. Our team are able to provide services throughout the Outer Eastern region that are professional, person-centred and cater for the changing needs of the people we service.

The following was written by one of our highly valued team members, Karen Oulten. It provides an insight into the important role support workers have in helping people remain in their own home. Karen has shared her experiences in working as a Cire in home carer.

As a team member of Cire In Home Care, my job is to provide support to seniors, and people with disabilities, in their own homes throughout the Yarra Valley and beyond.

 After studying aged care with Cire Training in 2015 I gained skills and knowledge of the aged care industry a dual Certificate III in Aged Care and Home and Community Care (now known as Certificate III in Individual Support). Once qualified, I was fortunate to gain employment with Cire In Home Care.

Cire in home carers follow organisational policies and procedures developed so we can provide high quality care to ensure our clients remain living safely in their homes, and whilst in our care, out in the community.

Our jobs are allocated by the care coordinator, Deb Wright. We are emailed an information sheet that details tasks and background information about our client. The services, which are tailored to meet a client’s personal needs, are varied. I very much enjoy having such variety in my day to day work.

I may start my day supporting a senior client to get out of bed and safely move to the bathroom, where I shower them, help them dress, do their hair and perhaps apply make-up, if the client is going on an outing.

I may also prepare breakfast for a client and ensure they take their medication. Many clients use a Webster Pack (prepared by a chemist). As a personal carer, my level of training does not allow me to dispense pills or medicine. My responsibility is to watch that a client takes the pills out of the correct day/time compartment of the Webster Pack and swallows them. If I see they’ve missed taking any of the pills, I must immediately report the situation by phone and follow-up email to my care supervisor.

Another situation immediately reportable by phone to my supervisor is NO RESPONSE of a client upon arrival at their home. Cire has a strict policy and procedure to follow if this should occur.

I have an insulin-dependent diabetic client. Due to his vision impairment, my job outline is to correctly set-up the glucometer blood glucose monitor with a test strip. He does a finger prick with a glucolet pen, and then I ensure the blood is applied to the strip to record a blood glucose reading. The reading is stored in the monitor’s memory for referral by the client’s doctor. I write date, time and result in a communication book, for other carers. I then oversee that he dials up the charted dose of insulin which he injects by needle into the stomach and ensure the blood contaminated strip and insulin needle are disposed of in a sharps container.

I worked in customer service for 20 years at Bayer Diagnostics, a company which manufactures blood glucose monitors and test strips, and I was trained in its use. I never would have thought back then that I’d be using this skill as I am now.

Some other tasks and services I might carry out as a carer are:

  • Home cleaning, changing bed linen, washing, ironing
  • Check contents in fridge and cupboards for out of date food, help client prepare a shopping list
  • Meal preparation – breakfast, lunch or dinner, cook meals which could be frozen
  • Transport client to shops, ensuring they remain sturdy on their feet using a walking aid, wheel client around in a wheelchair, help them select healthy food items, carry shopping bags into the house and unpack items into fridge or cupboards. Cire In Home Care has a no cash handling policy for carers; the client must be able to manage their own money.
  • Post hospital support – bed bath or shower client, meal preparation, change bed linen, washing
  • Transport client to medical appointments, or social outings
  • Transport and accompany a young disabled adult to the cinema, shop for clothes, attend a sporting event, an outing to a café
  • Respite – looking after a client, providing company and conversation when a spouse, son or daughter (their carer) has to attend their own appointments, or a social outing. A carer also needs time out and to be cared for.
  • Respite for a parent or grandparent caring for a child with a disability. Providing an extra set of hands to help a parent cope whilst their partner is away, to get other young children fed, bathed and bedtime stories read.
  • Home safety assessments on a first visit to a client’s home, using the Cire Services Home Safety Checklist sheet to identify whether a person’s home complies with Australian OHS standards; that it’s safe and accessible for the support worker to undertake their tasks. It also shows where improvements can be made to make a home safer and more comfortable for the client to remain living there.

I believe an in-home carer’s most important attribute is not just to be task oriented. A friendly and happy disposition sets the tone for time together with a client. I can’t expect clients to be trusting of me and happy to have me in their home if I’m grumpy.

Being intuitive about a client’s wellbeing is also important. I can sense from chatting with them whether they are feeling down, and notice when they appear unwell. Many of our clients may be grieving the death of a partner or other family member and experiencing loneliness. It’s my duty of care, and to follow Cire Policy, to report these changes in a client to the care supervisor.

 I might be a client’s only visitor in their week so I strive to offer them companionship and a listening ear, without judgement. As I’ve built up a closer relationship with a few clients I’ve discovered you can never under estimate the positive effect of a caring hand touch.”

“At the end of a shift I go home feeling I’ve made a client’s day; and this in turn uplifts me.”

Karen is one of many carers we have at Cire In Home Care. If you are interested in studying to become a carer, Cire Training offers Certificate in III Individual Support and we are now taking expressions of interest for 2017 courses. If you would like further information about the services we offer visit our website at click here or call 1300 835 235.