Posts

Lilydale Toastmasters welcome Cire recruits

Lilydale Toastmasters is the latest example of how Cire loves connecting with groups and organisations to help people be their best selves and contribute to building stronger communities.

In an unusual twist, our Toastmaster collaboration is achieving exciting outcomes for our own teams which will indeed benefit the wider community we endeavour to empower and support.

Lilydale Toastmasters recently offered memberships to Cire Services, thanks to a generous sponsor.  There was great interest across Cire’s teams resulting in Maddie Lowrie, Director of Cire Early Learning (formerly Cire Children’s Services) Mount Evelyn and Naomi Taylor, Business Development Officer with Cire Training enthusiastically accepting the invitation.

The opportunity was made possible by Harriet Shing, Labor Member for Eastern Victoria Region, who provided the sponsorships to introduce new members to the Lilydale Toastmasters.  As a former member of the group, Harriet fully appreciates the value of Toastmasters for participants. Harriet’s commitment to encouraging others to consider joining will contribute to the ongoing longevity of the organisation, and the broader contribution it makes to our community.  Members often work with other groups to share their knowledge and experience.  One example of this is a representative joining Cire’s Small Business Hub for a session in the coming weeks.

The introduction on its Facebook page describes Lilydale Toastmasters as

“A diverse group of people with the common aim of becoming better communicators and leaders”.

Working on the premise that people learn in moments of enjoyment, Lilydale Toastmasters has gained a reputation as vibrant and successful.

This has certainly been the experience of Maddie and Naomi.  While their motives for joining are based on further developing communication and leadership skills, both have noted their increased confidence.

In reflecting on her experiences in joining Lilydale Toastmasters, Naomi says:

“Joining a new group, and stepping out of one’s comfort zone, can be challenging at the best of times, but then adding public speaking makes it so much more daunting.  This has been a great experience though and, as Maddie agrees, the members have been extremely welcoming.  Everyone has made an effort to help me feel comfortable and confident to join in, at whatever level I’m keen to do so.”

With the club celebrating its 40th year, members enjoy the long-standing friendships and network connections they have made.  One sign of respect is the group’s “Patrick Owl” Award in honour of a highly regarded member.

Current president Joy Harte, comments:

“We are a friendly bunch keen to share our knowledge. We try to make our meetings educational, but enjoyable. Every time you attend a meeting we hope you leave feeling empowered and more in control of those nerves that can make public speaking a challenge.”

This sentiment is echoed by Naomi, who agrees “if you’re keen to gain confidence in public speaking then Lilydale Toastmasters is the place to do it”.

If you’d like to learn more, head to the group’s website.

Cire student a highlight of Rotary year

A presentation by Cire Community School student Elise, a Rotary scholarship recipient, was a timely and inspirational morale booster for the Rotary Club of Wandin in 2020, according to immediate past president, Paul Martin.

In reflecting on his term in office, Paul described Elise’s presentation via Zoom as a highlight of the year – COVID shutdowns and restrictions had brought the club’s community service to an abrupt halt and while members felt they were kicking few goals, they were inspired by Elise’s maturity and willingness to share her story and aspirations for the future.

Paul’s report was delivered at the club’s recent annual changeover function where Ben Vallence was inducted as the incoming president. Cire is one of the first organisational members of the club.

Paul said: “It is so rewarding to meet those who benefit from Rotary initiatives, “It gives true meaning to what we aspire to do, to make a positive difference to the lives of others.”

Elise and Wellbeing Coordinator Stephen Duke were special guests at a club Zoom meeting during a COVID lockdown in 2020, to acknowledge the awarding of a $2000 scholarship. Elise, was one of four students from the Community School to each receive $500 from the fund awarded by the club in conjunction with the overarching District 9810 which covers a large portion of Melbourne’s south east extending from Templestowe to Upper Yarra, to Chelsea to Beaumaris.

Stephen explained to the Rotary meeting that Cire Community School focuses on each student as an individual with unique needs; it’s a school of choice for young people who need a positive alternative to mainstream education.

Elise, who has missed many years of formal schooling, explained that Cire understood that challenging behaviour is a reflection of a student’s mental health and wellbeing rather than a desire to ‘act out’.

Elise impressed Rotarians with her maturity and candour and the way she articulated her story, and her determination to pursue a career in social work, drawing on her lived-experience and the challenges she has overcome at such an early age.

In his address at the recent annual changeover function, newly inducted president Ben Vallence emphasised the importance of contributing and giving back to community.

“Giving of yourself is the ultimate gift you can make to another and it’s only through volunteer organisations like Rotary where your giving can have such life changing impact.”

The father of two, he hoped that he and his wife Bridget MP, State Member for Evelyn, were leading by example for their sons with their community involvements:

“To my two beautiful boys, Rory and Emanuel. I know that Rotary might not be the coolest thing in the world for you two, but I want to thank you for your love and support of me undertaking this role. Boys, I know you may not appreciate it now, but I think you know how much your Mum and Dad have tried to set an example of giving back to your community and helping those who most need it.”

In his address, Ben commended Paul Martin, supported by his wife Trish, on his leadership during such a challenging and unprecedented term as president.

“This year’s Rotary message is to ‘Serve to Change Lives’. This message personifies the spirit of our club. Even with all the restrictions and lockdowns that the pandemic brought, our club stayed strong in helping so many in the community,” Ben said.

In 2020, the club:

  • provided more than $3,000 worth of meals as part of a Second Bite program at Wandin for those in need. Warratina Lavender Farm, owned by Rotarian Peter Manders and his wife Annemarie, donated $1500.
  • donated $2,000 to a family whose Wandin home was razed by fire.
  • funded local children to attend Rotary’s Camp Awakenings, and a further six to attend their own school camps and may have otherwise missed out because their families were experiencing financial hardship.
  • provided three children from Woori Yallock with new scooters, to help them get to school and also provide some much needed respite from COVID lockdown and restrictions.
  • delivered books to more than local 400 students as part of the Books in School program.
  • delivered 1,000 bags of apples to local students, donated by Old Oak Orchards, owned by Rotarian Gavan Corbett’s family.
  • Awarded a $2000 scholarship shared by four students at Cire Community School.

Ben said delivering the apples were a highlight for him: “My son Emanuel came running to the car with an apple in one hand yelling, ‘Dad look what Rotary gave us’.

Wandin Rotary welcomes new members. Anyone interested in club membership are invited to contact club president Ben Vallence at benvallence@gmail.com

Pictured: Newly inducted president of Wandin Rotary, Ben Vallence, and his wife Bridget and their sons Rory, 13 and Emanuel, 10.

Click here for further information on Cire Community School and education programs.

 

FICE goes mobile

Cire Training’s First Impressions Clothing Exchange (FICE) has gone mobile with the launch of a pop-up roadshow to connect with even more women in the region who would benefit from the FICE experience.

FICE goes mobileThanks to a Yarra Ranges Council 2021 Community Grant, FICE is reaching out to women who may otherwise find it a challenge to visit the Mooroolbark shop to access affordable quality clothing and, equally important, a range of support services and the opportunity to connect with others.

Cire’s Yarra Junction Community Hub hosted the first pop up event on Wednesday 28 April with others to follow at the Healesville Living and Learning Centre on Wednesday 12 May, Selby Community House on Wednesday 26 May and Warburton Redwood Centre on Tuesday 8 June.

The Yarra Junction event created much interest with its high visibility set up on the pavement outside the hub. Quite a few customers bought clothing and also received on-the-spot assistance through services such as resume writing.

FICE trainer Renee Cook (pictured) said it was great to see so much interest in FICE and to answer questions about the social enterprise which has gone from strength to strength since opening its shop front at Mooroolbark in mid-2019.

She also said there is now a permanent rack of FICE clothing for purchase at the Yarra Junction Hub. It will be refreshed regularly so spread the word. Donations can also be dropped off at the hub.

FICE emerged from Cire Training’s successful Women’s Warehouse program, BY long-term unemployed women in the Yarra Ranges region FOR local women experiencing financial disadvantage.

FICE is unique to our region with its innovative and bold approach to empowering women and fostering meaningful community engagement.

The initiative provides women with affordable quality clothing suitable for job interviews or other important occasions. However, the benefits go much deeper. Through volunteering in the shop, women gain a huge boost to their confidence and self-esteem, a sense of purpose and pride as well as a raft of skills sought by employees, particularly in the retail sector. The experience also provides pathways to other support services and referrals, training and potential employment opportunities.

The broader community has enthusiastically embraced the project as volunteer mentors to assist the women on their journeys as well as donations. First Impressions participants have been touched by the random acts of kindness and help from strangers, seldom experienced before.

First Impressions is a real-life training space, mentoring women to stand tall by preparing them for employment. Experienced trainers provide ongoing support to instil confidence and develop the skills necessary in the paid workforce, and transferable between jobs, as well as overall support. Some of the tangible benefits include project management/store management/retail skills/merchandising, sewing, design, and customer service/communication.

Of significance, Cire is looking forward to renewing its work-for-the dole partnership with local job provider, Employment Plus, in the not too distant future. Volunteers gain recognition for their hands-on work experience as well as access to lifelong employability skills, assisting the transition toward sustainable employment.

FICE supporters include Yarra Ranges Shire Council, Voices of Women (VoW), a not-for-profit organisation based in the Yarra Valley that provides advocacy for women in the region, the Australian Women Donors Network, Good360 and L’Oreal and the Commonwealth Bank.

Charlie digs deep for community pantry

Donating cash to help stock the community food pantry at Cire’s Yarra Junction Community Hub was a perfect fit for Warburton’s Charlie Pizarro-Gaultier

Charlie digs deep for community pantryCharlie, who owns vintage clothes shops in Warburton and Healesville and is the driving force behind the Warburton Community Opportunity Shop, is always striving to make a positive difference in the lives of others.

When he found himself with surplus vintage stock earlier in the year, and not needed by the op shop, he decided to have a $1 “fire sale” and donate the proceeds to a worthy cause. Aware of the many people doing it tough in the Upper Yarra particularly, he felt donating to the food pantry was a great way to provide support. Not only did the $490 donation directly benefit those in need but it supported Cire, whose values align with Charlie’s. The “fire sale” also helped reduce even more items going into landfill unnecessarily.

“It was a win-win all round’ said Charlie who has a background in social work and lives his life with a broad humanitarian brush through his sharply focused social justice lens.

Charlie digs deep for community pantryHumble about his giving and reluctant to be profiled, Charlie hoped that his donation might help encourage and inspire others. He believes everyone has a responsibility to do their bit and help others where they can, and that businesses have an obligation to contribute in some way.

While his Charley Horse Vintage shops at Warburton and Healesville are doing well, equally important to him is the Warby Community Op Shop. Sales through the shop help support the needs of vulnerable women and others needing a hand up, the local CFA and Upper Yarra Wildlife Refuge.

 “The level of socio-economic disadvantages experienced by many people in the Upper Yarra and the constant risk of homelessness often falls under the radar. It doesn’t take much for people’s circumstances to change dramatically,’” Charlie added.

Charlie hopes to develop the op shop into a hub of support and referral where people have a sense of belonging and connection and can access support and referrals in a welcoming and safe environment. Currently, its main focus is clothing, with any quality donations welcome, with the hope of also expanding to include furniture.

For anyone interested in donating quality clothing, The Warby Community Op Shop, at 3459A Warburton Highway.  Is open Wednesday, Thursday and Saturdays.

Cire’s Community Hub at Yarra Junction also welcomes donations of non-perishable food which can be left at the hub or at reception at our Lilydale office.

Pictured: Cire’s Karina Stone and placement student Jenaya re-stock the pantry at the Yarra Junction Community Hub Karina; Charlie (inset).

Anzac biscuit cook up for Rotary

Cire Community School students have responded to a call out from Wandin Rotary for Anzac biscuits for the club’s community Anzac Day Service.

They eagerly bunkered down in the school’s Hospitality Training Centre at Yarra Junction to bake dozens of Anzac biscuits to serve up at morning tea, following the club’s Anzac Day Service at Wandin.

The students were delighted to support the club which has been hosting the community remembrance for about 20 years. Not only did some of them taste test Anzac biscuits for the first time but the initiative also sparked their interest in Anzac Day and its significance and to share their own family’s connections.

The cook up ticked some additional boxes for students studying for their Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning (VCAL), satisfying one of the learning outcomes required for their course. One of the VCAL strands is Professional Development Skills (PDS) which aims to develop student knowledge, skills and attributes that lead to self-development and community engagement through family, social, community and environmental responsibilities; resilience, self-esteem and efficacy; and health and wellbeing. This partly involves responding to a need in the community. Their Anzac biscuits were of huge benefit to Wandin Rotary who hosted the morning tea assisted by Wandin CWA and much enjoyed by those who attended, as well as being rewarding for the students.

Cire Community School

(pictured above from left to right; Cire Community School Students Rd, Callum, Tiarna and Bella)

VCAL students commented:

  • It makes me feel great to help out on Anzac Day because my Great Grandmother was a nurse in WW2. I feel like I’m giving something back. It is so great to have our new kitchen (completed in 2020), with the new equipment we have we can improve our skills and do events like this for the community quickly.. Bella (pictured)
  • These opportunities make me feel good knowing that I’m helping in the community. We only come to this campus once a week specifically for this subject, we love the amount of new foods we can explore in this fantastic new space. Tiarna (pictured)
  • My Great Pop was in WW2. By helping bake Anzac biscuits and supporting Wandin Rotary and it being Anzac Day gives me a sense of pride. Ella

One of the baking sessions was timely for a Middle Years mixed class of Years 7 to 9 students. It provided a real life context to a Maths class earlier in the day as they had to work out how many times they had to multiply the recipe to bake the required number of biscuits, as well as work out ingredient quantities.

“The biscuits taste different but still yummy, said Callum (pictured) who was in charge of weighing the butter.

“They taste great. I hope they (Anzac Day attendees) like them,” added classmate “RD” (pictured)

While the history of Anzac biscuits varies, the following is one of the more popular accounts.

During World War I the wives, mothers and girlfriends of the Australian soldiers were concerned for the nutritional value of food being supplied to the troops.

Food was transported across the sea at a maximum speed of ten knots, or 18.5 kph, by ships of the Merchant Navy. Most of these ships did not contain refrigerated facilities, so food had to remain edible for at least two months. That is when the Anzac biscuit was “invented”, based on the Scottish recipe using rolled oats, sugar, plain flour, coconut, butter, golden syrup, bi-carbonate of soda and boiling water. The ingredients did not readily spoil and were easily maintained. Some soldiers also used crushed biscuits to make porridge.

The biscuits initially were called ”soldiers biscuits” but were dubbed Anzac biscuits after the landing on Gallipoli in 1915.

As the war continued, many groups like the Country Women’s Association, churches, schools and other women’s committees made Anzac biscuits to send to the troops.

Cire Services Inc. is one of the first organisational members of Wandin Rotary Club.

Children captivated by butterfly project

Young learners at Cire Children’s Services have been captivated by a wonderful butterfly project, welcoming some much anticipated and beautiful new arrivals at our Yarra Junction, Mount Evelyn and Chirnside Park sites.

As part of a Junior Landcare and Biodiversity initiative, the children have been learning about the life cycle of butterflies and monitoring special hatching kits to see chrysalis (pupa) turn into butterflies. The butterflies will be progressively released into specially created butterfly habitats at each centre.

Children captivated by butterfly projectThe project has captivated all visitors to the Children’s Services sites where educators have created wonderful foyer displays as well as engage children in focused sessions which have included research, butterfly stories and slide show presentations.

It has been thrilling for the children, and staff, to witness the butterflies hatch and soon release them into specially created habitats.

Cire Children’s Services was fortunate to receive Junior Landcare and Biodiversity grants of almost $5000 for the butterfly habitat projects at each of its three sites.

The awarding of the grants in 2020 was timely given the challenges of COVID, particularly Children captivated by butterfly projectlast year, and to help keep children engaged and give them something exciting to look forward to in the new school year, as well as help beautify the outdoor learning spaces.

The Junior Landcare and Biodiversity project involves the development of habitats featuring native plants that attract butterflies, and the purchase of chrysalis kits so the children can witness and learn about the life cycle of a butterfly. The kits are enabling the children to follow the growth of butterflies, releasing them into the habitats once they are hatched.  As part of the project, children have monitored and measured how long it takes for the chrysalides to hatch, measured their growth, explored the best plants for the habitat and will count how many butterflies visit the habitat.

Diletta Lanciana, Executive Manager of Cire Children’s Services, said the project is a wonderfully engaging way to assist children with numeracy, literacy and STEM ie science, technology, engineering and mathematics.  It is also helping beautify outdoor spaces at the centres for children and their families to spend quiet time and enjoy the natural environment.

In the meantime, the children can proudly call themselves lepidopterologists and may even learn how to spell the tongue-twisting name of those who study and collect butterflies.

Click here for further information on Cire’s Children’s Services.

Cire delivers for Second Bite and Rotary

Cire is supporting the Second Bite fresh food program in the Yarra Ranges through its organisational membership with Wandin Rotary.

Cire has joined the Rotary club’s roster to collect freshly cooked and frozen meals and deliver them to Yarra Valley Seventh-day Adventist Church volunteers for distribution to those in need in the Wandin area.

The Second Bite Program was launched several years ago by LinC in conjunction with local church groups with Wandin’s inclusion on the list in recent months. Other locations include Millgrove, Yarra Junction, Woori Yallock, Warburton and Mooroolbark.

From Wandin Senior Citizens Hall, food is being distributed to up to 30 families each Friday with some elderly residents collecting for their neighbours who are less mobile.

In a ‘paying it forward’ gesture, one woman in her 80s arrived with a shopping trolley overflowing with oranges she had picked from her tree to share far and wide.

‘Everyone receiving the food is so appreciative,’ said Pastor Emanuel Millen.

“It is so wonderful to see so many different groups working together to help those experiencing challenging times,’ he added.

Congregation member Veronica Tirchett who helps coordinate the program said the church was thrilled to be another outlet for the Second Bite Program at Wandin Senior Citizens.

“In light of the global pandemic, we thought that this would be a great help to those in this local community to support them through these tough and difficult times,: Veronica said.

“Hardship can happen to anyone and the cost of fresh food can make it difficult for people in need to maintain a balanced diet. We have a new public distribution point to assist people in need to have access to a range of seasonal fruit, vegetables and bread.”

Wandin Rotary has been assisting by collecting frozen meals and delivering them to the Senior Citizens Hall each week.

Rotarian Gavan McIntyre said the club had been delivering about 40 meals each week thanks to the generosity of a Rowville woman, Christine Smith who operates a commercial kitchen. Christine is currently having a break so the club is covering the cost of purchasing frozen meals while she is away.

For more information on the Wandin program, contact 03 5967 1272 or visit their website.

Main image – Cire’s Melissa Lizza (second from right) with Ian, Beth, Sheree and Rob from the Yarra Valley Seventh-day Adventist Church.

Beauty class supports homeless

Cire Community School’s beauty class has thrown its talents behind community organisation Stable One Yarra Ranges to help the homeless.

Beauty class supports homeless The class is also appealing to others to support its Stable One campaign through initiatives such as its GoFundMe page, and contributing new clothing and essential items.

Supporting Stable One came about due to COVID-19 restrictions when the class could no longer visit aged care facilities to provide manicures to the elderly who are at high risk as a result of the pandemic.

Lead teacher Megan Small said the class has truly stepped up and personally grown from the challenge, setting up the fundraising initiatives, and asking for donations of essential items and also canvassing businesses.

 “I have gorgeous outgoing women here that are ready to make a difference,” said Megan.

One student Karina said: “It feels good to know that we are all helping, especially for those in need in the Yarra Valley.”

The class has explained its initiative in the following article:

Our beauty class has selected a few ways to help raise money such as our GoFundMe page, and donations box in the front office at both Yarra Junction and Mt Evelyn campuses.

Beauty class supports homeless We are also encouraging essential item donations such as food, clothes, toiletries and miscellaneous items. All items donated will be given to those in need and any money raised will be used to fund larger items such as mountain bikes, games and puzzles.

Please don’t donate second-hand items because it is our mission to provide the homeless with the joy and experience of something as simple as taking the tags off their new possessions.

We have made it our priority to ensure all our proceeds go directly to Stable One and the people in need. This is a cause close to our hearts and those in the community; so your support and generosity in this time of need would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you! – Cire Community School Beauty class

Hayley and Kailea set up the GoFundMe page, which has so far raised almost $400.

“It’s exciting when you check it and see the money has gone up. It’s nice to see,” Kailea said.

The young women said they were stirred into action after the class sat down together to learn about the Stable One success story of James, a man who had been living in his car in Chirnside Park.

“It gave us motivation because he’s a local to our area. Everyone goes to Chirnside Park, so we wanted to help give so that less people are in that situation,” Kailea said.

Stable One Yarra Ranges is a charity made up of several local churches, who assist the homeless community in the area with temporary supported accommodation. Over the past three years, they have supported more than 90 people in need.

Stable One founder Jenny Willetts said: “It’s not just about providing a roof. It’s about connecting people to the help they need, which will allow them to take steps forward.

“We’re all really learning about isolation at the moment when people who are homeless have always been feeling isolated.”

For more information about Stable One, visit their website. To contribute to Cire’s GoFundMe, click here.

 

Celebrating National Volunteer Week

Volunteering can be defined as ‘time willingly given for the common good and without financial gain.’ But volunteering is so much more than that as we know.

Volunteering can give someone a sense of achievement and purpose, help them feel part of a community and better about themselves. It can help them share skills, learn new skills and create a better work-life balance. It can help reduce stress and social isolation and help them meet new people and feel more connected.

And for Cire, volunteers add a wealth of diverse experience to the Cire team, support the critical work being done to deliver programs to the community, and help build that all-important community connection.

Cire welcomes and encourages volunteers from across the Yarra Ranges community and beyond who choose to contribute their valuable skills and time to enrich their local community.

National Volunteer Week – held Monday 18 May – Sunday 24 May 2020 – is the annual celebration to acknowledge the generous contribution of volunteers across the country.

In any other year, events would be held across the country during National Volunteer Week to say thank you to the millions of Australians who volunteer their time and energy.

Despite 2020 being anything but an ordinary year so far, we feel that it is more important than ever to recognise and acknowledge (albeit from afar), the generous and continued support of Cire’s volunteers and the commitment they show to the organisation, the team and their local community.

Volunteers contribute to Cire in a number of different and important ways, including:

  • facilitating and co-facilitating educational programs alongside Cire staff
  • providing reception and event coordination support at the community hubs in Yarra Junction and Chirnside Park
  • providing child care support at family and children’s services sites across the Yarra Ranges
  • participating in gardening and conservation works, and working bees
  • engaging in corporate volunteering

Daniel was our first volunteer at Chirnside Park Community Hub and he is an asset to our team. Daniel loves to set up and assist for our Bookaburra storytime and our Senior Citizens club that meet weekly at the centre. I asked Daniel what volunteering at Cire means to him and his response was:

“Volunteering at Cire means meeting new people and doing exciting jobs” – Daniel Bookaburra volunteer.

Each week at Bookaburra children aged 1-5 years enjoy listening quietly to stories, being stimulated by singing songs and being creative with an easy craft project.

“As a volunteer with this program, it is always pleasing to see the delight on the children’s faces as they interact with their parents and carers during these Bookaburra activities” – Lorraine Bookaburra volunteer.

The theme of this year’s National Volunteer Week is Changing Communities, Changing Lives.

At its core, Cire is driven by a vision to enhance the lives, capabilities and opportunities in our community, and volunteers play a key role in achieving this vision.

For being the welcoming face at a community hub and voice the phone directing community members to a course or opportunity. For setting up a meeting room for the weekly Spanish language class and leading a workshop for young people. For all of this and more, we thank you.

Click here find out more about volunteering opportunities at Cire.

Celebrating National Volunteer Week

Cire supports bushfire initiative with Wandin Rotary

Cire donated more than $700 to Wandin Rotary to directly support their initiative to aid those impacted by the devastating bushfires in the Corryong and Upper Murray region of northeast Victoria.

The money will help offset a $10,000 donation by Wandin Rotary to assist the Rotary Club of Corryong which is working tirelessly to help the local communities and individuals rebuild their lives.

Money raised by Rotary goes directly to those in need, without administration costs and other fees.

Whilst Cire staff contributed to appeals earlier in the year, the Rotary donation comprised of subsequent funds raised at a funky hair day by our Hubs and Children’s Services teams, which was then matched by Cire itself. The Wandin club’s pledge is from its major annual fundraisers including its Wandin Custom Car and Bike Show, the final night of which is on Wednesday evening 18 March.

“Cire is one of Wandin’s first organisational members and we are proud to be able to support the club in this way,” said Cire CEO, Gus Seremetis.

“Wandin Rotary is a small club but incredibly active in supporting the local community as well as reaching out to others in need.”

In commending Cire for its generous support, Wandin Rotary President, Dennis Hoehne, said the club chose to donate $10,000 to the Corryong Club so the funds would go directly to those most in need.

He said the Corryong Club had indicated that was most needed in the community was access to cash.

“Many people’s livelihoods have been taken away with little alternative income available. So far the Club has distributed $30,000 of its own funds to people who have either lost their homes or their properties have been severely damaged. The President of the Club lost his own home to the bushfires’’ Dennis said.

He said it was at times like these that the Wandin Club particularly valued organisational members like Cire who could help harness even more support through its staff and the communities it serves.

He said the club was always looking to expand its membership base so it could continue to provide and expand its work in strengthening local communities and helping those in need.

For further information about Wandin Rotary, please visit http://www.wandinrotary.org/